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Mad Em-Dashes is a St. Louis Cardinals blog by Dan Moore that does not want to waste your time. 

"The Most Ballyhooed Card of The '90s"

Frank Thomas, the first baseball-card-bubble Hall of Famer:

Things changed the following season. As the Big Hurt slugged his way to 32 home runs and a 1006 OPS in his first full season (finishing third in the MVP balloting), collectors flocked to his cards. His 1990 Topps card, for example, surged in value from 35 cents to $4 by the end of the season. While that may not seem like all that much, it was far and away the most expensive card of the Topps set that year. The card that really made collectors' mouths water, however, was from the 1990 Leaf set.
I'd love to read a book about the baseball card bubble of the early '90s, in which I was a fully-invested eight-year-old participant, but I'm not sure it's necessary. It would be just as easy to show them this quote from Beckett: "Frank's rocket ride to the Hot list summit was fueled primarily by his key Rookie Card, 1990 Leaf #300. The card is a hobby dream, representing the perfect match of an attractive, premier, in-demand card set and a power-hitting rookie in a major media center."

"The perfect match of an attractive, premier, in-demand card set and a power-hitting rookie in a major media center."

"The perfect match of an attractive, premier, in-demand card set and a power-hitting rookie in a major media center."

(My pride and joy was a Grant Hill rookie card with a transparent "skyview" center. You see, it's worth a lot of money because Grant Hill is the next Michael Jordan.)